School lunch is the subject of countless jokes and puns, but the lunch served to one higher schooler in Minnesota gained national attention for being genuinely bad.





Maryn Holler is a student at Apollo High School in St. Cloud. Earlier this week, Maryn was shocked by the low quality of the lunch she bought from her high school’s cafeteria. The meal contained melted cheese smeared on a hot dog bun with a few baby carrots and a container of dipping sauce.

Maryn refused to eat the odd assortment of food, posting a photo of it to Facebook. Maryn told her friends on social media that she wasn’t happy that the school charged her $3 for something that probably only cost them 50 cents to make. Maryn closed out her post by saying that she was grateful that her family has enough money for her to be able to eat real food at home.



Maryn’s post quickly went viral on Facebook, having been liked hundreds of times by users throughout the country. Most of the responses to Maryn’s post call the meal “pathetic,” while others say that the school should be ashamed to serve such things to their students.

In an interview with Inside Edition, Maryn said that she didn’t know how anyone in the administration could think that it was okay to serve meals like that in the cafeteria.


Maryn’s mom, Dawn, added that her daughter wasn’t trying to embarrass the school. Rather, Maryn loves Apollo High School wand wants to see it at its best.



After making the rounds on social media, the St. Cloud School District released a public statement on the matter, saying that they made a mistake in trying out a new menu item. Henceforth, the district promises to get student input in lunches.

In an update to her original post, Maryn said that she has since spoken to the school’s principal and nutritionist about meal items. Inside Edition reported that students will now enjoy ham and cheese sandwiches, applesauce, and a variety of fresh fruit and vegetables. Overall, it is good to see that Maryn was able to effect change and help her school to offer healthy and high-quality lunches.




What do you think of Maryn’s story? Did your school ever serve you questionable meal items when you were growing up? What do you think should be done to ensure that students are getting good lunches in school?

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