Bill Gates has announced that he is stepping down from the board of Microsoft.

The billionaire co-founded the company but now wants to focus more of his efforts on philanthropic activities.




Bill Gates has stepped down from the board of Microsoft. Credit: PA


In a press release, it was announced that the 64-year-old would continue to serve as a 'technology adviser'.

Gates said: "I am looking forward to this next phase as an opportunity to maintain the friendships and partnerships that have meant the most to me, continue to contribute to two companies of which I am incredibly proud, and effectively prioritise my commitment to addressing some of the world's toughest challenges."

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella commended Gates for his 'leadership and vision' and said the company would continue to benefit from his 'passion'.

He said: "It's been a tremendous honour and privilege to have worked with and learned from Bill over the years. Bill founded our company with a belief in the democratising force of software and a passion to solve society's most pressing challenges. And Microsoft and the world are better for it.


"The board has benefited from Bill's leadership and vision. And Microsoft will continue to benefit from Bill's ongoing technical passion and advice to drive our products and services forward. I am grateful for Bill's friendship and look forward to continuing to work alongside him to realise our mission to empower every person and every organisation on the planet to achieve more."

Last month, Gates pledged up to $100 million (£77 million) to help tackle the coronavirus through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


Bill and Melinda pledged up to $100 million to help tackle coronavirus. Credit: PA


The foundation - which was set up by the billionaire couple back in 2000 - said it hoped the funds would help 'improve detection, isolation and treatment efforts; protect at-risk populations in Africa and South Asia; and accelerate the development of vaccines, drugs and diagnostics'.

Gates Foundation CEO Mark Suzman said: "Multilateral organisations, national governments, the private sector and philanthropies must work together to slow the pace of the outbreak, help countries protect their most vulnerable citizens and accelerate the development of the tools to bring this epidemic under control.


"Our hope is that these resources will help catalyse a rapid and effective international response. This response should be guided by science, not fear, and it should build on the steps that the World Health Organization has taken to date."



Source: Ladbible

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