The fact is, all women have experienced this, more times than they can count.


A few years ago, I asked my husband to watch a video with me. The video showed a woman giving a keynote address and asking her audience to do something simple that ended up being something so profound for half of the people in the room. She said, "If you're a man and you have felt unsafe at any time during this conference, raise your hand." A handful of men put their hands up. Then she asked the women in the room to do the same thing: "If you are a woman and you've felt unsafe at any time during this conference, raise your hand." Nearly every woman in the room raised her hand. It was an epiphany for the men in the room and it was an epiphany for my husband.

My husband is a pretty "woke" dude, but the fact is, what women experience every day isn't something a man can really understand. The fact of the matter is, women are prey. Everywhere a woman goes, she has to constantly be looking around her wondering if anyone in the crowd is threatening to her safety. Then something even more troubling happens: we grow up and become mothers. Now, suddenly, we're not worried only about ourselves, but our vulnerable children. I've never in my life felt more vulnerable than I've felt when I was in a dark parking lot with my infant daughter late one night. Nothing crazy happened. It's just a very unsafe feeling.

I'm older and not attractive enough to grab attention everywhere I go and honesty, it's a relief. As a young attractive woman, I felt much more vulnerable. I have a beautiful daughter and when we go places, I see all of the eyes following her. It's not flattering to me. I see danger, not admiring glances. A man named Dane Weeks recently had an experience that was the same sort of epiphany that my husband experienced when we saw that video years ago. He told his story in a series of tweets , which we've screengrabbed here.

Weeks said that he was walking to the train one evening when a woman walked up to him and gave him a hug ad she whispered, "Please act like you know me. Three guys are following me for a while." He played along and walked her home, which was three blocks away. He admits that he hesitated because in the city, you never know when someone can have ill intentions, but "her hug felt too real to be fake."

Twitter
Twitter

He said that they exchanged numbers, and Weeks told her that he and his boyfriend would meet her at the train anytime she needed them to because she has to walk a dark route home every evening. As it turns out, Weeks is a counselor and had his own past experience with abuse, so he knew how to react quickly.

Twitter
Twitter

Later, he met her five-year-old son, who thanked him for helping his mother. The woman's mother also thanked him for being there.

Twitter
Twitter

Weeks acknowledges that men have created an environment of toxicity for women, and said, "I will do better." He thanked her for showing him what the world of women is like. It's something that he never knew or imagined.

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