Peeved homeowner sets up elaborate camera trap to spray his neighbours' urinating cats with water - but some moggy lovers think he's gone too far

  • Australian YouTuber Craig Turner created a water spray trap for trespassing cats
  • The water sprayer is set off by a motion detector, which is also linked to cameras
  • Mr Turner has filmed cats' shocked reactions to being sprayed and posted online
  • Prior to this, he said cunning cats urinated and attacked native birds in his yard

 

Perth man Craig Turner, who runs YouTube channel Turnah 81, has posted videos of the elaborate way he stopped cats urinating on his front door, garden and car.

Initially he hooked up a motion-activated alarm to a confetti launcher to keep the trespassing felines at bay before coming up with his most-effective idea - a motion-activated water sprayer. 

The motion detector is connected to two infrared video cameras, an SLR camera and a flash so Mr Turner is able to capture the exact moment the cats are sprayed.

Mr Turner said he was fed up with the urine stench, and was also doing his bit to help the estimated 1.5 billion native birds, mammals and reptiles killed each year in Australia by pet and feral cats. 

A trespassing cat is sprayed in the face at Craig Turner's home in Perth. The video producer created an automatic spray to keep the felines off his property as their urine was causing an unbearable stench


Automatic videos and photos clearly show the results of Mr Turner's elaborate cat trap. 

One picture shows a cat being sprayed in the face before dashing off while another showed a feline with its hind legs in the air as it dodged the wet blast. 

The spooked cats also look wide-eyed as they are suddenly flashed by the camera  for the SLR photos.  

Mr Turner said felines in the neighbourhood would spray his front door, car and backyard with urine and scratch his property. 

'In the first video from 2011, it was an ongoing problem. We had cats on the roof, keeping us awake at night,' Mr Turner told Daily Mail Australia. 

'Then territorial urination started and the cats kept outmarking each other, which made the smell worse. 

'We were working from home at the time and to have a meeting at the home and apologise for smell of the urine was just not nice.' 

He recalled one time when a cat urinated on his car and the liquid leaked through the passenger window onto the seat. 

Mr Turner said cats had been an on-and-off problem since 2011 and had recently become a pest once again in the last two weeks. 

The spooked cats looked wide-eyed as they are suddenly flashed by the camera for the SLR photos


In 2018, a mother native bird (pictured) and her chicks then began nesting close to the ground in his backyard last year, prompting the YouTuber to create his cat sprayer

In 2018, a mother native bird and her chicks then began nesting close to the ground in his backyard last year, prompting the YouTuber to create his cat sprayer to protect them, as he explained in his first video on the cat sprayer. 

'Two native New Holland Honeyeaters have decided to set up a home and raise a family in a nest that has been built way too close to ground level on the cat highway,' Mr Turner said. 

'I'm concerned they're going to get killed by the cats because it's happened in the past. 

'Us humans introduced cats here (Australia) in the first place, so I'm going to take some responsibility and help defend the nest while also hopefully reducing my ongoing cat p**s problem.' 

Thanks to his cat sprayer, Mr Turner said the fledglings were able to hatch and grow before leaving the nest. 

'Aussie honeyeaters tend to nest closer to the ground. They have snakes below them and larger, predatory birds above them,' he told Daily Mail Australia

'Some people say I'm interfering with nature and evolution but cats have only been here for 200 years - none of these native animals have an evolutionary response to cats.' 

Perth man Craig Turner (pictured), who runs 267,000-subscriber YouTube channel Turnah 81, has used a motion-activated water sprayer to keep the trespassing felines at bay since 2011


Mr Turner, who runs a DIY YouTube channel, pulled together $20 worth of items such as a 12V solenoid from his washing machine, plastic tubes, a convertor from his hose and a 12V power adapter to build the sprayer (pictured)


One of the cats that was sprayed by a Mr Turner's trap


Prior to saving the 2018 nest, Mr Turner said another would-be Honeyeater family was not so lucky. 

'We had a Honeyeater nest outside my daughter's bedroom window and we were monitoring them with cameras,' he said. 

'But one night, one of the neighbour's cats destroyed the eggs. I didn't tell my daughter because it was too gruesome. 

'They (the eggs) were probably almost ready to hatch because I could see their bodies on the road. It's frustrating and a simple solution is stopping letting cats out at night.'  

Mr Turner, who runs a DIY YouTube channel, said he put together the cat sprayer with just $20 worth of items: a 12V solenoid from his washing machine, plastic tubes, a convertor from his hose and a 12V power adapter. 

He also bought more specialised equipment such as 12V infra-red motion detecting module, which can be bought for as little as $3 online.  

The cunning cats normally jumped the fence into Mr Turner's yard, so he decided to keep the gate slightly ajar to allow them to walk right into his trap. 

He initially used a still photo camera to see if the cat sprayer was effective before also deploying video cameras to capture the moments. 

Mr Turner has now made six videos on his now-famous cat sprayer, one of which has more than 8.4 million views. 

Prior to this, he had made trap that sprayed confetti and shone a light on the cats to scare them away, but he says the water spray trap is much more effective. 

Mr Turner has now made six videos on his now-famous cat sprayer, one of which has more than 8.4 million views


A feral cat holds a dead rosella in its jaws in the Australian bush. Pet and feral cats together kill more than 1.5 billion native birds, mammals and reptiles each year in Australia

The video producer has received death threats from angry cat lovers over his YouTube videos. 

'Some people were angry, I actually had a lot of support from cat lovers. I have no problem with cats themselves,' he said. 

'I had a couple of death threats, they were empty threats though. They just seemed like they were from other countries and don't understand the impact cats have here.

'Feral cats start as a product of people letting pet cats out at night.'    

Australian National University (ANU) Professor Sarah Legge said there is no denying they cats are a huge problem for Australian wildlife, which evolved without cats.  

'Australia's mammal extinction rate is by far the highest in the world and cats have been a leading cause of at least 20, or two-thirds, of our mammal extinctions over the last 200 years,' Professor Legge said. 

'On average, each feral cat in the bush kills a whopping 740 animals per year. In a year with average conditions there are about 2.8 million feral cats, but that figure can double when good rain leads to an abundance of prey animals.

'On average each pet cat kills about 75 animals per year, but many of these kills are never witnessed by their owners.

'Whilst each urban cat kills fewer animals on average than a feral cat in the bush, in urban areas the density of cats is much higher (over 60 cats per square kilometre). As a result, cats in urban areas kill many more animals per square kilometre each year than cats in the bush.' 

A curious feral cat inspects a camera trap. Australian National University (ANU) Professor Sarah Legge said there is no denying they cats are a huge problem for Australian wildlife, which evolved without cats




 






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